If you love Faversham, join us. We seek to Cherish the Past, Adorn the Present, Create for the Future

Early Victorian

1838
Rural deprivation, still prevalent locally, prompted the last armed rising on English soil, the Courtenay Riots, led by ‘Sir William Courtenay’, in real life John Nichols Thom, from Cornwall. His agenda was a socialist one and was well supported by farm workers, but his ill-equipped little army was defeated, and he was killed, at the Battle of Bossenden Wood, just east of Faversham.

1840
Bachelor local solicitor Henry Wreight died, leaving his entire fortune to the town. It helped provide fine new almshouses (opened in 1863), two schools and a park (the Recreation ground), still enjoyed by Faversham residents today.

 

Image taken, with permission, from the Arthur Percival Archives. Galleries | My Site (arthurpercivalarchive.co.uk)

1841
After the opening of the North Kent railway from London to Strood the direct stagecoach service to London ceased, passengers travelling to Strood to pick up the railway there.

1845
Thomas Willement, who had revived the art of stained glass in Britain, moved to Davington Priory, whose church and other buildings he restored.

1849
Originally built in the 1830s, the Assembly Rooms were re-opened following a fire. Situated in Preston Street, these have now been restored to their former glory and are in use for their original purpose.

More details at The Assembly Rooms | Faversham, Kent (favershamassemblyrooms.org.uk)

Registered Charity  Number 1135262 - Company No 07112241
The Faversham Society - Registered Address: 10-13 Preston Street, Faversham, Kent ME13 8NS
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