If you love Faversham, join us. We seek to Cherish the Past, Adorn the Present, Create for the Future

Late Georgian

1774
Edward Jacob, a surgeon and four times mayor of Faversham, published his History of the Town and Port of Faversham in the County of Kent.

 

1801
The first national census recorded the town’s population as 3,500. It was then bigger than Bromley (2,700), Dartford (2,400), Herne Bay (1,200), Sidcup (200), and Whitstable (1,600).

1814
A National School was built in Abbey Street opposite Arden’s House, offering free basic education for 300 boys and girls.

Approx. 1825
Industrial-scale brickmaking began in Faversham, the product making possible the exponential growth of Victorian London. The so-called ‘London’ stock brick was made mostly in the Faversham-Sittingbourne area. The industry waned in the 1920s as the familiar pink Fletton brick could be made more cheaply in Bedfordshire.

1830
Rural deprivation and early farm mechanisation prompted the Swing Riots in Faversham and elsewhere in Kent and Sussex. Rioters destroyed threshing machines and set fire to hay-ricks. On conviction, a few were executed and many transported to Australia.

1836
The new Faversham Union Workhouse opened at the end of Lower Road, after the passing of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act, which provided for the compulsory formation of unions of parishes which would combine to provide consolidated facilities instead of individual parish workhouses. Its management was transferred to Kent County Council in 1929, when it became a hospital and residential home for the elderly. Superseded by other facilities, it was demolished in 1991 and new housing built on its site.

Registered Charity  Number 1135262 - Company No 07112241
The Faversham Society - Registered Address: 10-13 Preston Street, Faversham, Kent ME13 8NS
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